Harry S. Quigley
2006

Pilot

Born in Toronto, Quigley served during the First World War as a signaller with the 10th Battalion. Twice decorated, Private Quigley was cited for repairing «at least 100 breaks [of telephone lines] under heavy shell fire [and] also assisted a wounded officer to a place of safety». His brigade had to hold its line against poisoned enemy gas. In 1916, Quigley was transferred from the Army to become an air observer in the Royal Flying Corps. In 1917, he became a Sopwith Dolphin fighter pilot. He also flew seaplanes in the RAF and served as instructor. After the war, Quigley piloted Curtiss HS-2L flying boats, being involved in 1920 with the opening of the Canadian Air Force hydrobase in Roberval. He was then hired by Price Brothers papermills in Chicoutimi to organize one of the earliest forestry patrol air services. Operations began the same year, flying Martinsyde floatplanes. In 1922, the service became independent, bearing the name Dominion Aerial Exploration Co. With Quigley as chief-pilot and President, bases were established in Roberval, Trois-Rivières, Montreal, Sept-Îles and elsewhere. HS-2L and N.T.2B flying boats were soon added to the fleet (later FC-2s).

In 1917, he became a Sopwith Dolphin fighter pilot. He also flew seaplanes in the RAF and served as instructor. After the war, Quigley piloted Curtiss HS-2L flying boats, being involved in 1920 with the opening of the Canadian Air Force hydrobase in Roberval.

In 1926, wishing to diversify operations and not limit itself to photographic works, the company was renamed Canadian Airways, thus consolidating its pioneering status in early commercial aviation. A five airplane expedition made headlines by flying to distant Labrador Churchill Falls. In 1927, a search party consisting of Canadian Airways airplanes was also launched to look for Nungesser and Coli airmen, lost at sea while trying to fly from Paris to New York (successfully done in the other direction by Lindbergh 12 days later). One HS-2L searched as far as the Belle-Isle straight. Quigley was also one of the original airmail pilots. Canadian Airways was by then one of the major operators in the country. Man of vision with a business mind, Quigley sold his company in the fall of 1928 for health reasons. He died January 3, 1929, at age 40, following a disease attributed to his war service. The company was acquired by a group headed by James Richardson to become part of the first major airline in Canada created in 1930, which kept the name Canadian Airways.

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